Radley Balko’s “Rise of the Warrior Cop” Book Tour

Published On August 11, 2013 | By Pete Eyre | Articles
radley-balko-rise-of-the-warrior-cop-copblock

“Rise of the Warrior Cop” author Radley Balko

Radley Balko, who many of us know and love (unless you’re a corrupt or heavy-handed police employee), may be coming to your area to speak about his book Rise of the Warrior Cop.

If you’re in or around any of these towns, I encourage you to go and meet Radley, then listen, think, and act.

  • August 17, 2:20pm, Austin, Texas, Police Accountability Summit, sponsored by Peaceful Streets Project: Speech and book signing.*
  • August 24, 1pm, Libertas Found,  5430 West Chester Rd., West Chester, Ohio: Book signing. Sponsored by the Ohio Libertarian Party.
  • August 29, 7pm Salt Lake City Public Library, Salt Lake City, Utah: Speech and book signing, sponsored by Students for a Sensible Drug Policy at the University of Utah.
  • September 03, noon, University of Memphis Law School, Memphis, Tennessee: Speech, book signing. Sponsored by the University of Memphis Federalist Society.
  • September 05, Time TBA, Indy Reads Books, Indianapolis, Indiana: Book signing, sponsored by the Marion County Libertarian Party.
  • September 18, 6:15pm, Roosevelt University, 430 S. Michigan Avenue, Angel Reading Room, Chicago, Illinois: Speech, panel discussion, and book signing. Co-sponsored by the American Civil Liberties Union Illinois, Chicago Alliance against Racist and Political Repression, Illinois Campaign to End the New Jim Crow, Mansfield Institute for Social Justice & Transformation (Roosevelt University), National Lawyers Guild (Chicago), People’s Law Office, Project NIA, TruthOut, Women’s All Points Bulletin
  • September 26, Time, Location TBA, Bloomington, Indiana: Speech and book signing. Sponsored by
  • October 15, Time, Location TBA, Mobile, Alabama: Speech and book signing. Sponsored by the Mobile Federalist Society.
  • October 17, Time TBA, Independence Institute, Denver, Colorado: Book forum. Sponsored by the Independence Institute.
  • October 21, Time TBA, University of Colorado Law School, Boulder, Colorado: Speech and book signing. Sponsored by the University of Colorado Federalist Society.

For those of you in Nashville, DC, or Philly I’m sorry to say that you may have missed your chance – Radley passed through in July.

*Jacob Crawford and I have plans to interview Radley next weekend in Austin (as part of our first stop on the Police Accountability Tour). Do you have any specific questions you’d like us to ask?
.

Head over to Radley’s personal site, The Agitator for a more extensive list of related content, including book reviews, book excerpts, and video interviews. The video above was one identified by Radley as “really great.”

 

Like this Article? Share it!

About The Author

Pete Eyre is co-founder of CopBlock.org. As an advocate of peaceful, consensual interactions, Eyre seeks to inject a message of complete liberty and self-government into the conversation of police accountability. Eyre went to undergrad and grad school for law enforcement, then spent time in DC as an intern at the Cato Institute, a Koch Fellow at the Drug Policy Alliance, Directer of Campus Outreach at the Institute for Humane Studies, Crasher-in-Chief at Bureaucrash, and as a contractor for the Future of Freedom Foundation. He later hit the road as co-founder of the Motorhome Diaries and Liberty On Tour, and now resides in the 'shire.
  • Casual Observer

    Mr. Balko provides interesting fact-based presentations…

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26bH7ZL2W8E

  • Jason Free 123

    This is a great book, and I’m glad to see it’s getting a lot of press in the mainstream media. Good to see the conversation growing.

  • Jason Free 123

    I see I now have an imposter. This guy Radley Bl=alko is a freak. He is nothing but a fucking paranoid ignate trying to convince everyone else he isn’t crazy. Well he is. The majority has spoken.

  • Shawn

    @Jason

    Interesting that you call someone concerned about the growing level of violence in police paranoid, but you don’t consider that same growing violence by police to be paranoia. Even though they aren’t even in the top ten dangerous jobs.
    The innocents shot in the Dorner hunt, a woman shot in her own back yard, cops shooting each other, 80k swat raids a year now, etc. I can find numerous incidents of paranoia by cops. But that goes right past you.

  • Ariel

    Shawn,

    Only those that question authority are paranoic, those in authority that are always “afraid for their safety”, even to the point of seeing a smart phone as a possible gun, aren’t.

    The funniest line is “the majority has spoken”, clearly lacking any real understanding of what this Constitutional Republic is really about. The “majority has spoken” is mob rule. Authoritarians are a strange bunch as they never realize they are the driving force behind every despotic theocracy or ideology.

    Serving a misdemeanor warrant in SWAT gear is the height of paranoia.

  • Shawn

    @Ariel

    I was thinking that the majority of people I know hold cops in contempt. And like me, most of them have clean records.

    “Serving a misdemeanor warrant in SWAT gear is the height of paranoia.”
    My favorite was a guy SUSPECTED, never confirmed, of taking more than the legal limit of fish that morning. Clearly a deranged individual that would shoot his way out of that one.

  • Casual Observer

    @Ariel

    Police officers have also mistaken cigarette lighters, garden hose trigger nozzles, bibles, pizza, bar code scanners, a can of car wax, and an umbrella for guns, often with lethal consequences to the unarmed individuals involved.

  • Ariel

    Both of you, yeah, I know. They’ve shot people for reasons we would be so ashamed we’d likely take a plea just to hide (that’s sarcasm, after the prosecution has come up with every permutation of what they can charge, as well their intimidation of “if you take this to court”, a plea looks good even for innocent people).

    They’ve used SWAT type apparrel, numbers, and weapons, for someone that two officers and a knock should suffice to a reasonable person not buried in the insular mindset of the profession (ex-cops, even retired, are interesting on how their mindset changes). Too many, and I don’t mean a majority, just too many, act as if they, and only they, have the right in any encounter to go home for dinner. I won’t belabor it, as much as it deserves to be.

  • YankeeFan

    Ariel,

    Your concluding line is something I agree with. I watched Mr Balko’s interview with the Cato Institute. This was the same interview in which the executive director of the tactical police officers association was also given equal time and it was interesting to hear him talk about the way S.W.A.T. is being used today. He talked about some court ruling that stated is was O.K. for S.W.A.T. to be used for regulatory statute enforcement. He talked about how some representative of some licensing board was accompanied by S.W.A.T. to go check for cosmetology licenses. Why in hell would that be necessary? (I know the answer) Seems they found drugs and made a couple arrests. Not enough PC to get a warrant so send in K-9′s with S.W.A.T. to go do a license check of barbers/cosmetologists.

    I’ll let you check it out yourself but go read the Bellotte V Edward’s case from the 4th. It was a qualified immunity hearing and it wasn’t that it went against the police but look at their rationale for using a S.O.R.T./no knock against raid against that couple.

    I have always believed that most or a big % of police view Americans as perps or potential perps. They oppose any attempt at civilian oversight as they use the, they just don’t understand our work, line of bull crap. Their use of police special op’s teams in situations where violence doesn’t exist but creating fantastical reasons to justify it, is insulting to any intelligent American.

  • Ariel

    YF,

    I’ve followed Balko for over 10 years. He isn’t some nut case, except to authoritarian nut cases, but someone who has studied these practices and questions their efficacy, their meaning regarding civil liberties, and the meaning of “police” as to what they should be in a society based in civil liberties, well beyond the self-serving bureaucratic arguments of the police (and yes, patrol officers are bureaucrats by being “rigidly devoted to the details of administrative procedure” while ignoring where those procedures stomp on rights).

    I’ve read all sorts of mind-numbing rationales by police that wouldn’t hold up to Freshman English, Philosophy, Comparative Religion, or even Engineering tenets (first, do no harm by being stupid or justifying the harm by doing more stupid). Not to mention a first-level primer on fallacies on the Internet. Still, they think they are making real arguments because they have authority, with no understanding of the meaning or limitations of “authority”.

    “I have always believed that most or a big % of police view Americans as perps or potential perps. They oppose any attempt at civilian oversight as they use the, they just don’t understand our work, line of bull crap. Their use of police special op’s teams in situations where violence doesn’t exist but creating fantastical reasons to justify it, is insulting to any intelligent American.” To them, it’s insulting that any American criticize or judge their job, because only they know their job. They, on the other hand, are so fully informed by their authority that they can judge or criticize any other profession, usually with derision or dismissal. Yeah, they make fantastical justifications, but their logic is skewed and they never see it. The escalation to violence where none existed prior seems de rigueur for policing today. Of course, if you define not moving fast enough as a prelude to violence then they are only being preemptive. Oh, wait..

    Why do you think when a cop is accused of excessive force, the first thing you read from police departments is that the citizen “has a record (speeding); he was arrested for (but they don’t mention the charges were dropped); he was convicted for assault (they don’t mention level); ad nauseum, but fail to mention that the cop has been suspended for excessive force (assault), forged reports, or lying on the stand? They immediately start to dirty an accuser because they think it makes them clean. As a profession (that means in the aggregate for you cops, not all), they have the lowest level of clear thinking I’ve seen, combined with the highest usage of logical fallacies.

    Really, YF, if you want to know the percentage of screwed up cops, look to the ones that say “I’m a government employee not a public servant”. It goes from there.

  • Ariel

    Yf,

    I forgot one thing, special pleading is just pure bullshit. A profession that does that needs to gain some real cojones and stop it.

  • StanfordMilgram

    Ariel is a genius

  • Common Sense

    And what ever happened on the “wrong address” warrant in Buffalo? Adam got pretty quiet.

    100-150 SWAT raids per day? Perhaps it should be phrased as “3 raids per state, per day” – That puts the number in some better perspective. Of course, it doesn’t further the agenda of the left, but so be it.

    Sorry, SWAT is not going away. When the public, whether law abiding or not, has access to 7.62/5.56 ammo, then the police will wear plates and carry rifles.

    I wonder what would have happened had Deputy Neil Gardner been armed with a patrol rifle and not a pistol during Columbine.

  • Ariel

    Common Sense,

    Balko isn’t a leftist. Whatsoever, nada, zilch, no how. I’m not either.

    Uh, he would have waited for the shooting to stop. That’s what happened at Columbine, by cops in armor with rifles.

    BTW, SWAT isn’t “wear plates and carry rifles” it’s a technique, a method. But it does allow dress up to make one feel butch.

    Personally, I hope you wear a good kevlar vest with plates everyday. But that still wouldn’t make you SWAT, just less comfortable but safer. Stay safe, but don’t do it at the expense of an innocent.

  • Ariel

    StanfordMilgram says:
    August 12, 2013 at 6:52 am

    Ariel is a genius.

    Given my nature, I take that as a slam. If you meant it otherwise, please don’t do it again. Address arguments with counter arguments, slam people or praise them within the arguments, but this hanging, declaratory stuff just makes me t.’d off.

  • Ariel

    StanfordMilgram,

    Okay, I went through more of my email, it’s how I keep track of and comment back to CopBlock, and you’re sarcastic as hell. So it’s okay, call me genius all day long. I’d take offense if you were serious.

  • Jason Free 123

    Shawn I got news for you, every swinging dick activist is writing a book or articles like this on cuntblock. Someone who is doing book signing events like this at the local hippie coffee house really isn’t a celebrity. His book will go where all the other activists books go, used for balancing out a wobbly coffee table, in the garbage, ect.. It’s nothing but hypothetical paranoid conspiracy theories. Of course the sheep activists will buy it wich will be about all 200 of you.

  • Keith

    Looks like slappy learned a new word…”ignate”, we can expect to see it multiple times in every post for about a month.

  • Shawn

    @Ariel
    @Common

    ‘Balko isn’t a leftist. Whatsoever, nada, zilch, no how. I’m
    not either.”
    Those who like what LE is doing keep pushing the myth that only Libs have issues with cops. Freerepublic is a conservative site that proves otherwise.

    “Uh, he would have waited for the shooting to stop.
    That’s what happened at Columbine, by cops in armor
    with rifles.”
    Again and again, cops have been so focused on their own safety they do nothing until it is too late. Wasn’t it one of the more recent incidents where the cops waited to go inside, while shooing was still going on.

    “BTW, SWAT isn’t “wear plates and carry rifles” it’s a
    technique, a method. But it does allow dress up to make
    one feel butch.”
    Cops will not get that it is the tactics, not the tools that are an issue. Still, even allowing some of these tools has affected their thinking, and some tools should not be use nearly as freely. Flashbangs for one. A little girl was burned by one during a raid on a nonexistant meth lab. It is still a dangerous military device, not appropriate to a civilian world.

  • Jason Free 123

    Shawn – Of corse police officers are worried about their safety. WHat good would the police officer be if he were shot and killed when responding to save your ass. You don’t fucking write the police protocols IF you think you can do it better then join the police force. Non lethal tactics work a lot better then what you think. A lot of lives have been saved by them including the police officers. Activists who fucking bitch, piss, and whine, about the government leaders yet they do not vote. Unless you are are going to fucking back it up, don’t spout off about this garbage.

  • Shawn

    @Jason
    ” Shawn – Of corse police officers are worried about their
    safety. WHat good would the police officer be if he were
    shot and killed”

    What good are cops who are so worried about their safety they wont risk themselves? In one of the recent school shootings, there were comments about cops waiting outside while the killing was still going on.

    ” Non lethal
    tactics work a lot better then what you think.”
    But some don’t meet the dream. Most nonlethal devices still have drawbacks that should limit their use. Tasers are not phasers from star trek, and flashbangs are still an explosive device that can harm people. Sorry, but that isn’t acceptable. Not for serving a warrant. And definitely not on a dry hole like the little girl i mentioned earlier.

    Too often, this stuff seems to get used because it is FUN, without regard for the limitations. Even a cop had commented, “is using anything with the word bang in it really such a good idea when hitting a suspected meth lab.”

  • Shawn

    @Jason

    As for tactics, cops claim that using swat to raid for warrants protects innocent lives is a lie. SWAT raids protect cop lives at the expense to the innocent.

    Raids may protect guilty people’s lives, but that is low priority.

    Here is where defenders of SWAT miss it. If cops raided my home, presumably by mistake since I don’t even have as prime, I can be harmed in the resulting chaos.
    If they knock and serve the warrant old school, I might get mad, but there is no danger of violence because I am innocent and never had any intentions of harming a cop.

    So the raids are a threat to innocent lives, and do nothing to protect my life. It serves cop interests at the expense to the innocent.
    And that doesn’t even include the other effects of raids.

  • Casual Observer

    @Common Sense,

    Current statistics prove that there are well over 8,000 S.W.A.T. operations conducted annually in the United States. This number can be broken down to an average of about twenty raids per day. Any attempt to minimize perceptions any further, would involve an obvious intent to deceive members of the public regarding the excessive scope of the problem.

    The reasons unnecessary displays and use of lethal force continue to expand, has little to do with the types of weapons available to members of the American public. Evidence clearly points in the direction of asset forfeiture, and the unscrupulous habits demonstrated by certain members of law enforcement and regulatory agencies, who choose to bypass the 4th Amendment whenever there is inadequate evidence to establish probable cause for the issuance of a proper search warrant.

    Justifying a position solely based upon conjecture (as you, “t” and “ThirtyOne Bravo” regularly choose to do), fails to address the well-documented abuses currently taking place. Once officers are comfortably anonymous behind masks and armed with select fire weapons, we are all at risk of becoming the next victim of their proven trigger-happy excesses.

    When a 92-year-old woman like Kathryn Johnston of Atlanta Georgia, is killed by officer who think themselves above the law, then police unions step into the picture and attempt to prevent the proper prosecution of those who violate the very laws they’ve sworn to uphold. In fact, if not for a federal probe into the facts of the Johnston case, the entire matter would have been swept under the rug by the Atlanta Police Department

    More than 50 innocent people have been killed by S.W.A.T. officers, and yet you continue to claim that agencies with this type of militarized force (which now include the Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Labor, Department of Education, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, Fish and Wildlife Service, and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Institute) are somehow justified. The costs of tragedies created by these raids are not only described in terms of innocent lives lost, but in the tens of millions of taxpayer dollars paid to victims of improper and egregious conduct by S.W.A.T. officers.

    SEE: “Federal Offenses: Law-Enforcement Teams Grow at U.S. Government Agencies” by Louise Radnofsky, Gary Fields, and John R. Emshwiller featured in the Wall Street Journal of December 17, 2011

    The obsession of those, like yourself, with obtaining and operating lethal military hardware could easily be solved by choosing to deploy to an actual combat zone. As of 2013, there are more than 200,000 mercenaries employed by the federal government in Afghanistan and Iraq. Obviously, there is ample opportunity for the sadists in police uniforms to “get some,” but instead they seek to turn our nation into a combat zone by deploying military weapons and tactics against anyone who dares threaten their revenue stream.

    If S.W.A.T. deployments actually made for a safer society, then we’d already be there. Just like rumors of “weapons of mass destruction,” are the constant refrain used by those cheerleading for future military occupation, unknown and unquantifiable threats are constantly being propped up as the reason police officers must resort to terrorizing the populace behind masks and inside armored vehicles. This argument isn’t merely ludicrous… it’s pathological.

  • Casual Observer

    *by officers

  • Shawn

    @Casual

    That is 80,000 raids a year.

  • Jason Free 123

    Shawn – prove swat raids don’t protect lies. You are making fucking shit up again. THe police do a job. A good job. Unfortunately fucking activists with fingers up thier asses think they know more than the police which they don’t and they won’t back it up. The cherry picker who wrote that ridiculous book continues to do so because fiction is fun. It riles up ignorant activists such as yourself to start spouting off garbage and facts you cannot back up.

  • Shawn

    @Jason

    “THe police do a job. A
    good job.”

    Tell that to their victims.

  • Casual Observer

    @Shawn,

    Thanks so much for the correction. That would average out to almost 220 S.W.A.T. raids per day in the good old U.S.S.A.

  • Shawn

    @Jason

    I’ll explain the lie again.

    Cops claim that raids for warrants protect innocent lives. They question is, how exactly? From an altercation with police showing up at my door?
    Why would an innocent person get into an altercation with police over a warrant? I’m not going to get into a gun fight over a drug lab that doesn’t exist. So by a standard knock raid, neither I nor the cops were in any danger at all.
    How then did raiding me protect me at all? Can you answer that?

    If the cops for some reason decided to raid my home, bad intel, wrong address, etc. I am totally innocent of any wrong doing. I don’t know it is a cop. I have no reason to suspect cops would be interested in me. I assume armed robbery. Confrontation occurs.
    That means an innocent life was now placed at risk for no reason.

    Or like in one case recently, where the residents didn’t even attempt to resist an attack. But a keyed up cop hallucinated a gun in the hands of a teen girl.
    Again, innocent family who was never a threat, was placed at risk by a wrongful SWAT.

    That kind of high intensity action easily leads to confusion about who and what is going on, snap decisions on how to react, etc. It is not a situation that allows time to think for either side. Both sides simply react.

    The end result is that if the raid is on a criminal, it protects cop lives against a conflict with a criminal. And by criminal I mean you find evidence to make an arrest or already have it and are making an arrest.
    So cop lives are protected in that situation. Fine.
    But how many criminals actually would chose to shoot it out? Not many. Most of the time, a regular old fashioned warrant search will endanger no one. At worst, the drugs will go down the toilet.

    As for criminal lives, don’t even pretend you care about that. So that isn’t even relevant.

    But a mistaken hit on an innocent family they are now in danger of a misunderstanding of who and what is going on. They are also in danger of accidents. Cops have tripped and discharged their weapon, killing a suspect.
    But these people were never at threat in the first place. And even if no one is harmed, there are lasting affects to this kind of action. Numerous reports of traumatized families with children unable to sleep. Reputations destroyed because a raid is not quiet. Everyone knows. Property damage that cops rarely take responsibility for. And of course a new hate for cops.
    So explain to me how using SWAT for warrants protects innocent citizens?

    I would love to see cops give up SWAT for one year and see what happens, at least for against nonviolent offenders and offenses. I’d seriously doubt you would see the streets run red with cop blood.

  • Common Sense

    Ariel,

    Actually the school liaison officer/deputy engaged one shooter, except he fired from 60 yards away with is pistol. Had the deputy deployed a patrol rifle, things maybe have in fact turned out differently.

  • Shawn

    @Casual

    Think about it. 220 a day. if only one percent was a mistake raid, that means more than two families wrongfully hit every day, 365 days a year. That is over 700 families, of an average of 4 or 5 people. That means 2800 to 3500 innocent victims of police paranoia. If that isn’t sobering, what is?

    And that 1% is questionable. A town I read about a couple years ago had an arrest rate of under 25%, and conviction rate of under 10%.

    I strongly suspect their wrongful raid number is at least near 50%. That happens when judges stop forcing the cops to actually justify a warrant and start rubber stamping them.

    These raids are on the rise, while the criteria for justifying them is dropping like a stone. You don’t have to read Ulysses to see that the number of CFs is going to rise.

  • Casual Observer

    @Common Sense,

    If pigs had wings… police would not need helicopters.

    Your resort to conjecture has once again been duly noted.

    @Shawn,

    My first post in this thread provides a link to a Radley Balko presentation and follow-up discussion recorded at the Cato Institute. Balko discusses the fact that S.W.A.T. raids were temporarily suspended in Washington, D.C. over safety concerns, and during that same time period overall crime stats dropped.

    Of course, there’s probably no effective way to correlate that data into a compelling mathematical proof, but it is somewhat disturbing that police departments and federal agencies are not interested in even researching this phenomenon.

    Authorities have used Sec. 17 of the Privateering Act of June 26, 1812, as the basis for imposing property forfeiture upon the people of our nation. Those police agencies that engage in seizure have effectively become pirates in service to the treasuries of their particular jurisdiction. Those who serve in a regulatory capacity and employ S.W.A.T. teams in violent invasions, are nothing more than road agents employing intimidation by means of the threat of lethal force in order to seize private property without a clearly defined warrant.

    The overall level of criminal activity in our nation, has not risen in a proportion equivalent to the increase in the number of S.W.A.T. teams and S.W.A.T. raids. The one statistic which does tend to directly correlate with the rise of the “warrior cop,” is the amount of private property and money which has been seized from the American public during that same time period.

    Any argument based upon the CONJECTURE that American citizens must provide proof of the source of their property or monetary assets, is nothing but totalitarian propaganda meant to normalize theft by the state. Just as SCOTUS did, when it upheld the right of a local government to seize private property on behalf of developers in 2006, police agencies and S.W.A.T. teams primarily choose to enforce forfeiture law merely as a means of enhanced revenue collection.

  • Jason Free 123

    Shawn – You didn’t answer my question. Prove swat raids don’t protect lives like you claim. You are saying it now back it up. If you are raided and it’s a mistake, just cooperate with the PD, everything will come out fine. Act like a stupid ignate, things won’t turn out fine. Raids that are done at a wrong address are very very few and far between. Nothing is perfect. How about when the police raid meth labs within neighborhoods and drug houses. The swat teams are protecting you. They are taking out the criminal element that causes more destruction then a simple swat raid.

  • Shawn

    @Jason

    I did. You just don’t like the answer. Or you’re too stupid to comprehend it. I’ll try and make it a couple quick sentences.

    In no way am I in danger from a normal warrant. But a SWAT raid exposes me to their high violence and the risks that go with that.

    “Nothing is perfect. How about when the police raid meth labs within neighborhoods and drug houses. The swat teams are protecting you.”

    Please, that is the one area I agree with the drug lovers about. Only a fraction of drug labs get hit, and other replaced them almost before the cops leave. Those raids don’t protect me from shit.

    By the way, usually they DON’T raid a methlab. Too volatile. That was pointed out over on policeone in the same article with the burned girl.
    But they still manage to go after meth. Maybe it is because need being the mother of invention, they found other ways besides the war gear.

    You’re a dumb ass that needs SWAT to come visit you, then you’ll understand what the issue is. People like you, T, common, all need that experience. Maybe if your child was shot at because a cop hallucinates. Maybe if your children can’t sleep or feel safe in their own home. Maybe if you’re humiliated in front of your entire neighborhood, with your house half wrecked, and all for nothing. Then you will get it.

  • Jason Free 123

    Shawn – Just how many fucking swat encounters have you had? YEs, the fucking do raid methlabs suimb fuck. All you are doing is making shit up and then telling it. You didn’t answer my question: prove swat raids don’t protect lives. Obviously you are to fucking stupid to answer the question. I said “Prove” not give me your bullshit. You have never been exposed to a swat raid and you more than likely never will. Again, you are fucking making bullshit up and signing your name to it.

  • Common Sense

    More sobering numbers.

    Drunks kill 30 per day.

    Fatal car accidents? 100-115 per day.

    Overdose deaths? 105 per day.

    Suicide? 80+ per day.

    Workplace deaths due to carelessness or negligence? 10-15 per day.

    Medical “mistakes” about 300 per day.

    Lastly,

    Police shoot and kill 1 person per day, typically not via SWAT.

  • Shawn

    @Common

    Drunks kill 30 per day.
    A crime society tries to punish.

    Fatal car accidents? 100-115 per day.
    For varying causes, most of which are crimial.

    Overdose deaths? 105 per day.
    Their own fault. Should we jail the corpse?

    Suicide? 80+ per day.
    Their own choice. Should we jail the corpse?

    Workplace deaths due to carelessness or negligence?
    10-15 per day.
    Businesses are held to account, some even criminally.

    Medical “mistakes” about 300 per day.
    Close, but usually i have the choice about going under the knife or not.

    Lastly,

    Police shoot and kill 1 person per day, typically not via
    SWAT.
    Which has nothing to do with the rest of your list. And cops can affect lives without killing a person.

    All of that list DOES matter, but this isn’t the forum for them. Those sites do exist , if they are causes that matter.

  • Shawn

    If they are causes that matter to you.

  • Common Sense

    We’ve all heard the hard luck story. The child that grows up in the broken home, parents, either together or not, drunks or dopers, no jobs, welfare, food stamps and somehow they grow to be a succuess.

    But for every “success” there are thousands of those who don’t. That will wallow in their place, there by the actions or inaction of their parent and/or parents and peers. And when the police come, they get the blame for being “scary?” Fuck that. Those who do illegal acts, they accept the risk. Those who are around them, accept them as well.

    If you honestly live in fear of a 4×4 truck, or some notion that a SWAT team is gonna flash-bang their way into your living room, then either you are doing something society has decided you shouldn’t do.

  • Shawn

    @Common

    ” If you honestly live in fear of a 4×4 truck, or some notion
    that a SWAT team is gonna flash-bang their way into
    your living room, then either you are doing something
    society has decided you shouldn’t do.”

    I would agree, if there weren’t daily stories of wrong house raids, dry hole where the cops were wrong, suspected grow houses that turned out to be vegetables, meaningless raids over something as stupid as fish, among other stories.
    Those people weren’t doing anything. And it is getting more common, as the criteria for using SWAT drops. 80k and rising. Some PDs use SWAT for everything, no matter how little intel they really have or how minor the crime. That is room for a lot of fucking up.

    I don’t give a damn about the drug dealers, but that isn’t the whole story anymore.

  • Casual Observer

    @Shawn,

    Please note that “Common Sense” did not address any of the points raised in my reply to him posted on August 12, 2013 at 1:55pm. There is a reason for his refusal to address the revenue enhancement mission of S.W.A.T. officers using an excessive display of deadly force, which all too often results in the deaths of innocent civilians: there is no defense.

    Instead Common Sense resorts to the tried and true tactics of misdirection via cliché (“blame the victim”,”if you aren’t doing anything wrong, then you have nothing to fear”). That’s also the reason for the inclusion of a red herring via comparison of societal fatalities; a list in which “Common Sense” fails to mention that more than 100 of the victims of “murder by cop” in the U.S. last year… were UNARMED.

    Defenders of police brutality and violence fail to see how the deaths of Kathryn Johnston and the dozens of the other innocent, unarmed victims mentioned in Balko’s book and elsewhere, are attributable to the incompetent and trigger-happy conduct of S.W.A.T. officers. Without that simple recognition, one can only argue that victims were responsible for their own demise, as he has done regarding the murders of Kenneth Chamberlain, Sr. and John Wrana.

    Long ago I came to the conclusion that Common Sense is in the employ of an agency whose task it is to mitigate legal action against officers who commit crimes. If not, then he merely chooses to defend them for free in online forums like this one. Frankly, I don’t know which of the two would indicate a person of lesser moral credibility.

    A police officer high on cocaine broke the neck of a close friend of mine, after a high speed pursuit. In the dark, the cop mistook my friend for the suspect, and put the boots to him while he was lying prone on the ground. Luckily my friend lived, but it took five more years and the agreement of the police officer to provide testimony on his behalf, before authorities would assume any responsibility for his violent actions while on the job. If the police officer had not already been prosecuted and convicted for his participation in a string burglaries and stealing cocaine from the evidence room, he probably would not have been willing to testify… and my friend may never have obtained justice.

    The double standard must end. Badges don’t grant extra rights.

  • Common Sense

    CO

    No, I didn’t response to your comment. Its stupid.

    Kenneth and John were both armed, one with a knife, deadly weapon, and the other was armed with 2 deadly weapons, 2 a knife and a cleaver. Contact the police while armed? Sorry buddy, that Constitution isn’t gonna stop bullets. Don’t want to comply? You could get shot. Its a roll of the dice, and you aren’t holdin’ them.

    Here’s some homework. Please articulate, the “military grade” weaponry that the NOAI possess and/or deploys. How about the Dept of Education SWAT and the Dept of Labor SWAT?

    .muckrock.com/foi/united-states-of-america-10/department-of-education-swat-team-6328/#748151-no-responsive-documents

    I am curious about your friends snapped neck. What’s is his and the officer’s name? When and where did this happen?

  • Shawn

    @Common

    “How about the Dept of Education SWAT and the Dept of Labor SWAT?”

    Here is a question. What is the Dept of Education and Dept of Labor doing with any armed force, outside an armed guard at the door, at all? Doesn’t that sound a little silly to you?

    Oh, as to your question to Casual. From wikipedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SWAT#Weapons
    I can’t say what each individual unit uses, but here is a nice list of firepower.

    While a wide variety of weapons are used by SWAT teams, the most common weapons include submachine guns, assault rifles, shotguns, and sniper rifles.

    Tactical aids include K9 Units, as well as flash bang, stinger, and tear gas grenades.

    Semi-automatic pistols are the most popular sidearms. Examples may include, but are not limited to: M1911 pistol series,[10][11] Sig Sauer series[12][13] (especially the Sig P226[11][13][14] and Sig P229), Beretta 92 series,[13] Glock pistols,[12][15][11][16][17][18] H&K USP series,[13][19] and 5.7x28mm FN Five-seveN pistol.[20]

    Common submachine guns used by SWAT teams include the 9mm and 10mm Heckler & Koch MP5,[10][11][12][13][17][18][19] Heckler & Koch UMP,[11] and 5.7x28mm FN P90.[21]

    Common shotguns used by SWAT units include the Benelli M1,[17][18][22] Benelli M4, Benelli M1014, Remington 870[10][11][14][17] and 1100, Mossberg 500 and 590.[13]

    Common carbines include the Colt CAR-15[10][11][16][17] and M4[11][12][14][19] and Heckler & Koch G36[18] and HK416.[23] While affording SWAT teams increased penetration and accuracy at longer ranges, the compact size of these weapons is essential as SWAT units frequently operate in Close quarters combat (CQB) environments. The Colt M16A2[12][14][19] can be found used by marksmen or SWAT officers when a longer ranged weapon is needed.[10]

    Common sniper rifles used are M14 rifle and the Remington 700P.[10][12][14][17][18][19] Many different variants of bolt action rifles are used by SWAT, including limited use of .50 caliber sniper rifles for more intense situations.[24]

    To breach doors quickly, battering rams, shotguns with breaching rounds, or explosive charges can be used to break the lock or hinges, or even demolish the door frame itself. SWAT teams also use many non-lethal munitions and weapons. These include Tasers, pepper spray canisters, shotguns loaded with bean bag rounds, Pepperball guns, stinger grenades, flash bang grenades, and tear gas. Ballistic shields are used in close quarters situations to provide cover for SWAT team members and reflect gunfire. Pepperball guns are essentially paint ball markers loaded with balls containing Oleoresin Capsicum (“pepper spray”).

  • Casual Observer

    @Common Sense,

    Sorry, not interested in disclosing personal information to an online psychopath like yourself. The officer involved pled guilty to 69 charges before being shipped of to prison. Have fun looking that one up.

  • Casual Observer

    *off

  • Ariel

    Common Sense,

    “Actually the school liaison officer/deputy engaged one shooter, except he fired from 60 yards away with is pistol.” Yes he didn’t have a rifle, so he let the shooting go on rather than trying to get closer. I’m not faulting him, necessarily, but it just wasn’t an act of bravery, but at least it was an attempt. The SWAT at Columbine waited until the dust cleared.

    Bravery isn’t having superior firepower, or even equal, nor superior numbers, as Audie Murphy and the “Go for Broke” 442 can testify. Damn, I just used a war analogy. Anyway, what underlies all this, is I get so sick and tired of a claim of bravery just by way of profession, rather than by real actions. The SWAT at Columbine were not brave.

  • Common Sense

    CO,

    Answering a question with a question I see.

    Actually you can’t list specifics about the “Department of Labor’s” tactical team because it doesn’t exist.

    Nor does one for the Dept of Education or NOAI.

    …and you friend doesn’t exist either.

  • Common Sense

    Ariel,

    I fully agree.

    Had SWAT gone in, perhaps the results would have been different. Their response at Columbine, with hindsight, was stalled via policy and procedure. They were not permitted to enter but treat the situation as a “barricaded gunman” and begin a siege. That is why many police department/schools have now, in the years that followed, begun “active-shooter” training.

  • Casual Observer

    @Common Sense,

    They sure have, in fact they actively shoot everything now… family pets, children, unarmed men and women, people at the wrong address attempting to protect themselves and their property from armed home invaders, etc. That’s a big part of the problem.

  • Casual Observer

    @Common Sense,

    The following links provide details regarding S.W.A.T. teams assigned to federal regulatory agencies and departments, as well as state agencies:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-w-whitehead/swat-team-mania-the-war-a_b_875967.html

    http://www.news10.net/news/article/141207/2/DOE-raids-Stockton-home-as-part-of-fraud-investigation

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hIlo7KD2L0

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91kAtalvVD0

    The name of the victim whose neck was broken by a police officer high on cocaine, is Butch Cunningham. Good luck finding his case, since it was a sealed, out-of-court settlement.

  • Ariel

    Common Sense,

    I had forgotten the P&P of that time/locale. They were constrained by “barricade” versus “active”, but it still doesn’t make them brave nor cowardly. Just doing their job as given to them.

    “Had SWAT gone in, perhaps the results would have been different. Their response at Columbine, with hindsight, was stalled via policy and procedure.” Historians make a big deal about thinking if you changed X then Y would happen, I forget their term but it translates to “bullshit”. The only thing we know is what happened. We can change policies all we want, but those changes do not gaurantee success. All we can hope for is that they minimize failure.

  • Ariel

    Hi, YF,

    He who shall remain nameless just did “argumentum ad populum”, one of the classic stupidities where “if so many people believe it true, or right, or moral, thus it is”. A classic justification for slavery, Jim Crow (the real stain on our nation prior to War Relocation), and even anti-miscegnation laws.

    People that embrace this fallacy aren’t salvageable by argument, because no argument can breach that wall. The only thing that matters is how many back them; classic mob mentality writ large.

    No real moral introspection, just “see, they agree with me”.

  • Ariel

    Hi, Shawn.

    “Those who like what LE is doing keep pushing the myth that only Libs have issues with cops. Freerepublic is a conservative site that proves otherwise. ” It comes down to people thinking in labels and forgetting a basic fact of words “they aren’t the thing” (what is a ball?).

    It’s easier for them to think it’s some group they can dismiss while embracing theirs, rather than look at the issues to form a real, and independent, opinion. I’m a civil libertarian Republican, it’s not easy to be that today. However, it wouldn’t be any easier to claim civil libertarian Democrat either.

  • Ariel

    Common Sense,

    CO got you on that one. Really, these regulatory bodies now have their own versions of SWAT. It’s gotten that silly…

  • Common Sense

    Ariel,

    Actually no, he didn’t. I figured he’d go with the DOE incident. That’s why I put it into my comment, guessing he’d bite. The situation really turned out to be something other than what was reported. That’s why the story died a quick death.

    The DOE IG was conducting a criminal investigation, not one of student loan fraud. The DOE does not have a tac team. The OIG has “powers of arrest” but does not maintain, equip or train a “tac team.” That’s why they contacted the local PD, to use their manpower (SWAT) since they don’t have it. OIG can secure search warrants for investigations and collect evidecne. Think of SIGTARP.

    .politico.com/news/stories/0611/56530.html (not the correction at the bottom where it was not a SWAT raid, but the person just thought it was)

    If you really want some fun reading.

    .sigtarp.gov/Quarterly%20Reports/July_24_2013_Report_to_Congress.pdf

    To continue,

    I fully agree, the outcome may or may not have been altered. Perhaps the Deputy’s 55gran rounds would have hit students. I will also agree that sometimes there is no “right or wrong” but “bad and worse” in critical incidents.

  • Common Sense

    Actually it have read (not SWAT).

  • Common Sense

    CO

    Sealed huh? Whatever you want to tell yourself.

  • YankeeFan

    Ariel,

    Howdy! This can be addressed to Common Sense as well. I have never had a personal issue with any police special ops team. Only the manner in which they are used is what I have issues with. Mr. Balko lays some of those scenarios out. S.W.A.T. doing a ride along with a member of the State Cosmetology Licensing Board is beyond absurd. The real reason was to get around the 4th as going the time honored way of getting a warrant would have been tossed back in their faces. That is besides the point. S.W.A.T. going along to do a license check is stupid and not the proper usage of S.W.A.T. and neither is the other scenarios he mentions.

    One of the real reasons this can be of concern is the fact that when you see some level of corruption it is always (usually) in some police special ops unit. Gang task force, S.W.A.T./S.O.R.T., narc units and etc. Planting of evidence, non existent informants, false testimony from informants, lying on warrant application just to name a few. Go see the Kathryn Johnson shooting to look at everything we know for a fact those pigs did. Another concern is that these are NEVER isolated incidents. Look at what happened to the APD in the aftermath. How many bad raids were done by those bastards? How many innocent people went to jail? It can be argued that the constant desire to use these teams against non violent persons or in situations where violence doesn’t exist, is really, well, bad!

  • Casual Observer

    @Common Sense,

    Whatever. That’s what the family told me… and the City Attorney.

  • Casual Observer

    “Texas Police Hit Organic Farm With massive SWAT Raid.” Nobody could make up stuff THIS stupid… except for Texas police.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/15/texas-swat-team-conducts-_n_3764951.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDzP8W8BQgE

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bA39bE6m7o8

  • Casual Observer
  • Casual Observer
  • Casual Observer

    The real reason for the disturbing increase in the number of S.W.A.T. type raids (80,000 per year), is asset forfeiture.

    http://www.policestateusa.com/archives/58

  • Ariel

    Hi, YF,

    This is very late. “Only the manner in which they are used is what I have issues with.” Same here. Whether it’s actually SWAT or just “SWAT-like”, it serves a real purpose and fills a need.

    But really, cosmetologists are armed to the teeth.