Ademo Speaks from Jail: “One Month Behind Bars”

It’s been a month since I was arrested, well kidnapped actually, for possession of a plant. While that plant helps people and causes no harm, I’ve spent the last 30 days on 19 hour lockdowns with people whose crimes actually have victims and/or involved violence. I don’t see the logic in caging someone who hasn’t harmed anyone, for having a plant that also hasn’t harmed anyone. Who is being protected by keeping me in this cage?

And while I still can’t discuss all the details of my case, I will say that I’m waiting to hear what the state prosecutor will offer me for a plea deal. Or for them to indict me and take my case up to a higher court. While taking a plea is not my best option, I won’t lie. If they let me go home A LOT sooner than the 1 – 3 years my charges could get me, I may consider it. I miss the loves of my life and that’s the only real punishment being inflicted on me at this time. There’s also a slim possibility I could make bond, but the state is sucking up all my resources, which is leaving me in a tough financial spot. That, of course, is all part of the game that the “JUSTICE SYSTEM” plays daily with millions of people.

Aside from that, I’m doing the best I can while behind bars. I’ve gotten myself into a pretty good routine built around the jail’s schedule of bringing me my food, laundry, mail and other personal items. I don’t get how they call these places “Houses of Corrections” when they basically wait on us hand and foot. Seriously, it seems that’s what they think corrections means. You don’t have to cook, do your own laundry, grocery shopping or anything. When the jail staff is not waiting on me, I fill my time with reading, writing, meditating, and a daily workout.

Initially, my reading started much like all other the inmates by selecting a murder mystery, horror story, or romantic novel – yes, harden criminals read those, I do not – from the jail “Library” (it shouldn’t really be called a library). However, about two weeks ago, I came across three far more interesting and mind opening books. They are: “The Essential Gandhi,”The Autobiography of Malcolm X,” and “Mirroring People.”

I haven’t gotten into the last two yet, because I’m really into Gandhi and am taking my time with it. He was an amazing man that I knew only a little bit about before reading this book. I wish I had learned more about him sooner as his messages of love and non-cooperation would have been invaluable to me in my early years of activism. It has even made me realize how some of my own anger within myself manifested through my activism. I’m attempting to incorporate his message of love and non-cooperation while locked up here.

Showing love to those who are caging me is much easier than doing non-cooperation. Yet, this jail currently has no law library, allows no books from the outside, and has the worst meals/commissary out of any jail I’ve ever been in. A time for non-cooperation within this jail may present itself at some point. Maybe after I give the other free thinkers (out of 100 inmates, I think I’ve found five) this book, it will become more likely. Time will tell and it seems that’s all I have in here so…I’ll keep you posted on that.

Writing is something I do a lot of while on lockdown. I write the occasional blog post and a few letters a week to my loved ones, plus those that send me letters of support. The bulk of my writing though is done in my diary, which I started two weeks after arriving. I call it the “Diary of a Drug War Victim” and it’s exactly what you would expect a diary to be; my inner thoughts and experiences while locked up here in the Warren County Jail.

I don’t think many people realize what happens to people inside these walls in such a detailed account. Not only to me personally, but to those who love me and are trying to help me, as well my fellow inmates. One could easily say that they – my loved ones – have been more victimized by the State’s actions toward me than the State could ever claim I’ve victimized by my “crimes.” While I intend to publish this diary at some point, right now it’s a major help to my sanity and a place for me to vent while I’m here. I’ve written over 75 pages already and send out 8+ pages each week at this time. There’s always something to talk about here in jail.

Two other things that help me keep it together while here are my regular meditation sessions and workouts. About three months ago (maybe a bit longer), my amazingly wonderful girlfriend – Ashley – turned me onto meditating. While life on the outside didn’t allow time for me to do so regularly, being in here has. Every morning from 9:30 am for as long as I can, or feel like, I face the sun coming into my window and meditate. This helps me to relax me, clear my mind, and bring me into balance. It also allows me time to think and assess any pending issues I have.

At first, it was difficult to block out some of the jail noise and, at times, even the noise within my own mind, but I’m getting better. Just like I wish I would have studied Gandhi sooner, I also wish I had taken up meditation sooner. Yet, it’s never too late and I encourage you to consider it as well. It’s something that must be experienced in order to understand its meaning and influence on one’s self.

Coupling my meditation with regular exercise has also been beneficial. Of course, it has. As we all know, exercise is good for people. It is even better and more important when you’re stuck inside a cell for 19 hours a day. While on the outside, I’m a fairly active person who has no problem getting adequate exercise. However, when you’re only outside of your cell for 4 hours and 45 minutes each day, you have to make up for lost time. So, I’ve created a five day workout routine using only my bodyweight and jail-issue towel. We have no weights or gym here, but I do fairly well.

I won’t be able to leave here looking like the Hulk or anything -mostly due to the lack of food I have access to – but I do feel better and will be pretty toned. Thankfully, I was already off the cigarettes this time around so I didn’t have to go through those withdrawals. And though I miss my medicine greatly, it doesn’t make you dope sick like nearly every other inmate that enters here.

Well, that’s pretty much it for now after my first month in jail. You are more than welcome to write me and I’ll do my best to write back. Also, if you’re so inclined, and since we can’t have books mailed in to us, feel free to mail me your favorite liberty minded post or blog content. Anything you think will help me or my fellow inmates expand our minds and better our lives. On that note let me end this with a Gandhi quote:

“I have all along held that one is bound to act accordingly to what one appears to be right though it may appear wrong to others.”

Until next time… ANARCHY + LOVE = PEACE

Note: Ademo is currently out on bond awaiting trial. Updates coming soon. 

Ademo can receive mail at the address below. Responses to this post, as well as general messages of encouragement and support are very much welcome and would be appreciated. Ademo has also asked for liberty minded educational materials to share with and do outreach to other inmates regarding the state and/or police and the “justice system,” especially regarding the War on Drugs and other victimless crimes. If you have access to such material, that would also be very much appreciated.

Ademo can be contacted by mail via:

  • Warren County Jail
  • C/O Adam Mueller – 61437
  • P.O. Box 309
  • Lebanon, Ohio 45036

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Ademo Freeman

was born and raised in Wisconsin, traveled the country in a RV dubbed “MARV” and is an advocate of a voluntary society, where force is replaced with voluntary interactions. He’s partaken in projects such as, Motorhome Diaries, Liberty on Tour, Free Keene, Free Talk Live and is the Founder of

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