Filming police is not a crime: Time Magazine joins the chorus

Time Magazine has become the latest in a string of mainstream media outlets to address the issue of police abusing wiretapping laws to censor people with video cameras and duck accountability.

Anthony Graber, a Maryland Air National Guard staff sergeant, faces up to 16 years in prison. His crime? He videotaped his March encounter with a state trooper who pulled him over for speeding on a motorcycle. Then Graber put the video — which could put the officer in a bad light — up on YouTube.

It doesn’t sound like much. But Graber is not the only person being slapped down by the long arm of the law for the simple act of videotaping the police in a public place. Prosecutors across the U.S. claim the videotaping violates wiretap laws — a stretch, to put it mildly.

These days, it’s not hard to see why police are wary of being filmed. In 1991, the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) beating of Rodney King was captured on video by a private citizen. It was shown repeatedly on television and caused a national uproar. As a result, four LAPD officers were put on trial, and when they were not convicted, riots broke out, leaving more than 50 people dead and thousands injured (two officers were later convicted on federal civil rights charges).

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Back when King was beaten, it was unusual for bystanders to have video cameras. But today, everyone is a moviemaker. Lots of people carry video cameras in their pockets, on iPhones, BlackBerrys and even their MP3 players. They also have an easy distribution system: the Internet. A video can get millions of viewers worldwide if it goes viral, bouncing from blog to blog, e-mail to e-mail, and Facebook friend to Facebook friend. (See photos from inside Facebook’s headquarters.)

No wonder, then, that civil rights groups have embraced amateur videos. Last year, the NAACP announced an initiative in which it encouraged ordinary citizens to tape police misconduct with their cell phones and send the videos to the group’s website, www.naacp.org.

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The legal argument prosecutors rely on in police video cases is thin. They say the audio aspect of the videos violates wiretap laws because, in some states, both parties to a conversation must consent to having a private conversation recorded. The hole in their argument is the word “private.” A police officer arresting or questioning someone on a highway or street is not having a private conversation. He is engaging in a public act.

Even if these cases do not hold up in court, the police can do a lot of damage just by threatening to arrest and prosecute people. “We see a fair amount of intimidation — police saying, ‘You can’t do that. It’s illegal,'” says Christopher Calabrese, a lawyer with the ACLU’s Washington office. It discourages people from filming, he says, even when they have the right to film.

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Most people are not so game for a fight with the police. They just stop filming. These are the cases no one finds out about, in which there is no arrest or prosecution, but the public’s freedoms have nevertheless been eroded.

Other major publications that have addressed this issue include The Washington Post (and here), ABC News, MSNBC, NPR , Popular Mechanics, and USA Today.

Mainstream media such as the New York Times and Washington Post have also been addressing the issue of police harassing, arresting, or otherwise interfering with photographers.

Also see Adam’s posts “No Question About It: Film The Police” and “Police: They Love & Hate the Camera.”

EPN

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  • Bert McDert

    Reminds me of the Black Panther-era logic of (to paraphrase) “If the police have guns, we need to have guns.” Well, police cruisers – and stations – capture everything on camera, so in order for that to be symmetrical we need to also have and use cameras. Perhaps we ought to also drive around with guns on our hips, tasers, handcuffs, and citation booklets. Wonder how it would go down if a cop pulled someone over and discovered that he or she was not actually outgunned.

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