Impact of Keene CopBlockers Covered by Keene State College Newspaper

Editors Note: The content below was originally posted to KeeneCopBlock.org on September 21, 2014. It is reposted here to demonstrate the positive impact those active with Keene Cop Block have had in their community – a college town of about 25,000 people.

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Last week the write-up CopBlock works to keep police in check, authored by Alexa Ondreicka, went live at The Keene Equinox, which has the tagline, “The voice of Keen State College.” Below are some experts from the piece

Click here to read the full article, which also gives:

  • more comments from Ian Freeman about his motivations and actions to help create a peaceful community
  • a recount from a student filmed by someone active with Keene Cop Block during his interaction with strangers wearing badges
  • comments by Amanda Guthorn, the director of campus safety at Keene State

By: Alexa Ondreicka

For years, videos have been floating around the internet exposing police officers in every way possible.

While there are many different viewpoints surrounding the actions of the police force, students at Keene State College in particular are being thrust into an entirely separate situation with the implementation of CopBlock every Friday and Saturday night.

CopBlock, according to member Ian Freeman, is a “decentralized organization—meaning nobody’s in charge of anybody else—that exists worldwide.”

Freeman noted that holding police accountable for their actions is their main focus, hoping to expose police officers who target people for “victimless crimes,” such as open container violations or possession of marijuana.

CopBlockers expose these police officers by video-taping their interactions with the people they are targeting and then placing the videos online for the public to see.

Graphic by Sean Crater, webmaster, Keene Equinox
Graphic by Sean Crater, webmaster, Keene Equinox

“A primary sort of weapon we use against the police is the video camera,” Freeman explained, “Police accountability is the focus of CopBlock, and the best way to hold them accountable, we’ve found, is through the public’s eye.”

Freeman said, “A CopBlocker can’t be there every time the police are behaving badly. It’s your responsibility to protect yourself and the best thing you can do is record your interaction. I’ve seen cameras change how a police-encounter goes more times than I can count. And usually changes it for the better.”

He continued, “That’s all it takes—to have a concern for the people around you. And trying to create an environment where the police behave better, hopefully, and that fewer people get hurt, and fewer peaceful people will get arrested.”

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EPN

Pete Eyre

Pete Eyre is co-founder of CopBlock.org. As an advocate of peaceful, consensual interactions, he seeks to inject a message of complete liberty and self-government into the conversation of police accountability. Eyre went to undergrad and grad school for law enforcement, then spent time in DC as an intern at the Cato Institute, a Koch Fellow at the Drug Policy Alliance, Directer of Campus Outreach at the Institute for Humane Studies, Crasher-in-Chief at Bureaucrash, and as a contractor for the Future of Freedom Foundation. In 2009 he left the belly of the beast and hit the road with Motorhome Diaries and later co-founded Liberty On Tour. He spent time in New Hampshire home, and was involved with Free Keene, the Free State Project and The Daily Decrypt.